Chop vs Shop

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Chop vs Shop

Post by Kangas on Tue Jan 15, 2013 10:51 am

For my first entry for 2013 I chose two words that sometimes cause confusion, specially for those who English is not their mother tongue. The words are "chop" and "shop".

In the oral speech they are quite easy to distinguish since they have a slightly different pronouciation, however in the written speech they can be confused. So let's see the differences ...

  • Chop

    verb (used with object)
    1. to cut or sever with a quick, heavy blow or a series of blows, using an ax, hatchet, etc. (often followed by down, off, etc.): to chop down a tree.
    2. to make or prepare for use by so cutting: to chop logs.
    3. to cut in pieces; mince (often followed by up ): to chop up an onion; to chop meat.
    4. (in tennis, cricket, etc.) to hit (a ball) with a chop stroke.
    5. to weed and thin out (growing cotton) with a hoe.
    6. Fox Hunting. (of a hound or pack) to attack and kill (a fox that has not begun to run).

    verb (used without object)
    7. to make a quick, heavy stroke or a series of strokes, as with an ax.
    8. Boxing. to throw or deliver a short blow, especially a downward one while in a clinch.
    9. (in tennis, cricket, etc.) to employ or deliver a chop stroke.
    10. to go, come, or move suddenly or violently.

    noun
    11. an act or instance of chopping.
    12. a cutting blow.
    13. Boxing. a short blow, especially a downward one, executed while in a clinch.
    14. a piece chopped off.
    15. an individual cut or portion of meat, as mutton, lamb, veal, or pork, usually one containing a rib.
    16. crushed or ground grain used as animal feed.
    17. a short, irregular, broken motion of waves; choppiness: There's too much chop for rowing today.
    18. rough, turbulent water, as of a sea or lake.
    19. chop stroke.


  • Shop

    noun
    1. a retail store, especially a small one.
    2. a small store or department in a large store selling a specific or select type of goods: the ski shop at Smith's.
    3. the workshop of a craftsperson or artisan.
    4. the workshop of a person who works in a manual trade; place for doing specific, skilled manual work: a carpenter's shop.
    5. any factory, office, or business: Our ad agency is a well-run shop.
    6. Education .
    1. a course of instruction in a trade, as carpentry, printing, etc., consisting chiefly of training in the use of its tools and materials.
    2. a classroom in which such a course is given.

    7. one's trade, profession, or business as a subject of conversation or preoccupation.

    verb (used without object)
    8. to visit shops and stores for purchasing or examining goods.
    9. to seek or examine goods, property, etc., offered for sale: Retail merchants often stock their stores by shopping in New York.
    10. to seek a bargain, investment, service, etc. (usually followed by for ): I'm shopping for a safe investment that pays good interest.

    verb (used with object)
    11. to seek or examine goods, property, etc., offered for sale in or by: She's shopping the shoe stores this afternoon.

    Chiefly British Informal
    12.
    1. to put into prison; jail.
    2. to behave treacherously toward; inform on; betray.


    Slang
    13. to try to sell (merchandise or a project) in an attempt to obtain an order or contract.

    Interjection
    14. (used in a store, shop, etc., in calling an employee to wait on a customer.)

    Idioms
    15. set up shop, to go into business; begin business operations: to set up shop as a taxidermist.
    16. shut up shop,
    1. to close a business temporarily, as at the end of the day.
    2. to suspend business operations permanently: They couldn't make a go of it and had to shut up shop.

    17. talk shop, to discuss one's trade, profession, or business: After dinner we all sat around the table and talked shop.


Kangas

Source: Dictionary.com

Kangas

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Join date : 2008-10-23
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