Which, Witch and Wish ...

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Which, Witch and Wish ...

Post by Kangas on Tue Sep 18, 2012 11:18 am

These three words are sometimes confused and the results are disastrous! Embarassed

"Which" is a pronoun and relates to a noun or nouns in the sentence. For example when you want to refer to a inanimate object or animal in particular. It used to be used for persons, however, even though it still can be heard, its usage is nonstandard. Example: "This is the book which was recommended by Sarah." The subject is refering to a particular book.

But if you say "witch", you will be refering to someone who professes or practise black magic. You certainly won't want to confuse it with which ...

"Wish" is a verb or a noun that expresses a desire for something. Example: "I wish I could win the lottery."

Once we understand these differences it's easy to distinguish the words and never make the same mistake again. Very Happy

Let's see the meaning of these three words, according to Dictionary.com

  • Which

    pronoun
    1. what one?: Which of these do you want? Which do you want?
    2. whichever: Choose which appeals to you.
    3. (used relatively in restrictive and nonrestrictive clauses to represent a specified antecedent): The book, which I read last night, was exciting. The socialism which Owen preached was unpalatable to many. The lawyer represented five families, of which the Costello family was the largest.
    4. (used relatively in restrictive clauses having that as the antecedent): Damaged goods constituted part of that which was sold at the auction.
    5. (used after a preposition to represent a specified antecedent): the horse on which I rode.
    6. (used relatively to represent a specified or implied antecedent) the one that; a particular one that: You may choose which you like.
    7. (used in parenthetic clauses) the thing or fact that: He hung around for hours and, which was worse, kept me from doing my work.
    8. Nonstandard . who or whom: a friend which helped me move; the lawyer which you hired.

    adjective
    9. what one of (a certain number or group mentioned or implied)?: Which book do you want?
    10. whichever; any that: Go which way you please, you'll end up here.
    11. being previously mentioned: It stormed all day, during which time the ship broke up.


  1. Witch

    noun
    1. a person, now especially a woman, who professes or is supposed to practice magic, especially black magic or the black art; sorceress. Compare warlock.
    2. an ugly or mean old woman; hag: the old witch who used to own this building.
    3. a person who uses a divining rod; dowser.

    verb (used with object)
    4. to bring by or as by witchcraft (often followed by into, to, etc.): She witched him into going.
    5. Archaic . to affect as if by witchcraft; bewitch; charm.

    verb (used without object)
    6. to prospect with a divining rod; dowse.

    adjective
    7. of, pertaining to, or designed as protection against witches.


  • Wish

    verb (used with object)
    1. to want; desire; long for (usually followed by an infinitive or a clause): I wish to travel. I wish that it were morning.
    2. to desire (a person or thing) to be (as specified): to wish the problem settled.
    3. to entertain wishes, favorably or otherwise, for: to wish someone well; to wish someone ill.
    4. to bid, as in greeting or leave-taking: to wish someone a good morning.
    5. to request or charge: I wish him to come.

    verb (used without object)
    6. to desire; long; yearn (often followed by for ): Mother says I may go if I wish. I wished for a book.
    7. to make a wish: She wished more than she worked.

    noun
    8. an act or instance of wishing.
    9. a request or command: I was never forgiven for disregarding my father's wishes.
    10. an expression of a wish, often one of a kindly or courteous nature: to send one's best wishes.
    11. something wished or desired: He got his wish—a new car.

    Verb phrase
    12. wish on,
    a. to force or impose (usually used in the negative): I wouldn't wish that awful job on my worst enemy.
    b. Also, wish upon. to make a wish using some object as a magical talisman: to wish on a star.


Kangas

Source: Dictionary.com

Kangas

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Join date : 2008-10-23
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Location : Sydney - Australia

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